The Symptoms of Stress 101


stress

by Toni-Marie Ippolito

Stress is everywhere. And while a little stress is OK —and completely natural— a high level can wear you down and even affect your health both mentally and physically.

For some, managing stress can be tricky, especially if someone doesn’t recognize the signs or causes. Your stress level could be raised due to work pressure, an overload of schedules, challenging relationships, or a fear of physical harm. 

What Is Stress? 

Stress is the body’s reaction to harmful situations, whether real or perceived. When you feel threatened, a chemical reaction occurs in your body that allows you to act in a way to prevent injury. This reaction is known as “fight-or-flight,” or the stress response. 

A stressful event—whether it’s a fear of an animal, flying on a plane, fear of losing your job or getting reprimanded at work, or facing a physical form of danger—triggers a surge of hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol, that rages through the body causing heart rate increase, shortness of breath, muscle tightening, and high blood pressure. It is the body’s natural way to respond to “danger,” or what it perceives to be a “threatening situation.” But it is not meant to last. 

It generally takes time for the body to calm down after the stress response has been triggered.

One step to help recognize your suffering from high-stress levels is to identify the symptoms.

Some symptoms of the stress include:

• Becoming easily agitated or frustrated

• Feeling overwhelmed, like you are losing control or need to take control

• Racing thoughts and difficulty relaxing and quieting your mind

• Feeling bad about yourself (low self-esteem), lonely, depressed

• Low energy

• Headaches, stomach issues including diarrhea, constipation, and nausea

• Tense muscles

• Chest pain and rapid heartbeat

• Insomnia

• Clenched jaw and grinding teeth

• Constant worrying

• Forgetfulness and disorganization and an inability to focus

• Focusing on the negative 

How can supplements help? 

Stress consumes key vitamins and minerals. If you don’t replace them with the right foods and vitamins, anxiety and stress can worsen. While supplements aren’t meant to replace prescribed medication or other doctor-approved therapies, they can be helpful to maintain your symptoms. There are a few vitamins and supplements you can take to help you manage your stress symptoms. 

supplements

Vitamin B-complex 

B-complex supplements contain all the B Vitamins your body that is vital to a healthy nervous system. They may also help improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Vitamin A

Vitamin C is not just for the common cold; it’s also said to have a positive effect on mood and brain function. It’s also a versatile supplement that benefits heart disease, cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

Vitamin D 

he hormone cortisol, which is produced when your body is under stress, can block the calcitriol receptor, and the absorption of vitamin D as a result. Therefore, if your training is causing you stress or anxiety, it may prevent you from efficiently absorbing this essential vitamin.

he hormone cortisol, which is produced when your body is under stress, can block the calcitriol receptor, and the absorption of vitamin D as a result. Therefore, if your training is causing you stress or anxiety, it may prevent you from efficiently absorbing this essential vitamin.

The hormone cortisol, produced when your body is under stress, can block the calcitriol receptor, and the absorption of vitamin D as a result. Therefore, if your training is causing you stress or anxiety, it may prevent you from efficiently absorbing this essential vitamin.

Since the hormone cortisol is produced when under stress and blocks the absorption of Vitamin D, it’s necessary to help ensure you are getting enough of the vitamin in your diet.

Omega 3 – Fish Oil

In addition to supporting heart health, fish oil contains an omega-3 fatty acid called Eicosapentaenoic acid, which has been linked to mood. Omega-3s are the basic building blocks of the brain and nervous system, so taking fish oil helps maintain a healthy level of cognitive function.

omega

The hormone cortisol, which is produced when your body is under stress, can block the calcitriol receptor, and the absorption of vitamin D as a result. Therefore, if your training is causing you stress or anxiety, it may prevent you from efficiently absorbing this essential vitamin.



Source link

Leave a Comment